Category Archives: Wood

Outdoor Sofa

We had some leftover “beams” from our DIY Restoration Hardware Bardenas table, and figured we’d put them to good use by making a matching sofa for the patio.  DIY furniture is the best, because you can customize everything.  For instance, we knew we wanted a sofa on our back patio, but we didn’t have much space.  And most of the outdoor sofas for sale are either very small (more like loveseats) or very large (more like sectionals).  We were able to build this sofa to the exact dimensions we needed.

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DIY Restoration Hardware Bardenas Table

A lot of our project inspiration comes from Restoration Hardware.  Let’s face it, RH’s furniture is jaw-dropping gorgeous, but a wee little bit pricey.  Ok… it’s way pricey.  Take this outdoor dining table, for instance.  Pretty, right?  Yep, we thought so, too.  But at $4,075 (for just the table!) it was a bit out of our budget.  So, being the DIY’ers that we are, we decided to make our own version of the Restoration Hardware Bardenas table.

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Distressed Wood STARS

Winter storm Jonas hit, and left us house-bound for the better part of 2 days.  These stars were the result.  They’re built just like our Wood Stars, but with a different (read: way better!) finish.  IMHO.

There are many techniques for creating a faux distressed look with paint.  Usually, if I want to achieve the distressed look, I’ll use a dry brushing technique.  But that technique can result in a streaky, mottled appearance, so I’ve been wanting to experiment with something different.  I read about the Vaseline distressing technique and thought it sounded promising, so we tried that on these stars.

The Vaseline technique is simple…

  1. Apply a base coat of paint or stain, and allow to fully dry.  We used Weathered Teak stain by Sherwin Williams.
  2. Dab on small amounts of Vaseline where you want the “distressing” to appear  (football fans: this is different than “Dab on ’em”)  😉
    1. Don’t glob on the Vaseline, just put on a very light coat
    2. The areas that have Vaseline applied will show through once your 2nd coat is applied, so consider what areas should look distressed based on “normal wear”
      1. Typically, these areas are the corners and edges
  3. Apply a 2nd coat using paint in a contrasting color (this coat must be paint), and allow to fully dry.  We used Muslin by Sherwin Williams.
  4. Using 120 grit sandpaper, lightly sand all areas.  The areas that had Vaseline applied will very easily sand off to reveal the base coat underneath.

Pretty easy, right??

I’m definitely a big fan of this distressing technique.  It’s easy and it results in a very natural-looking distressed finish.  We couldn’t be happier with our constellation of stars!

Boot Trays

We’ve had insane amounts of rain here in Charlotte, NC during the last couple months.  It’s been unseasonably warm for Nov/Dec (70’s!), but too rainy to take advantage of the nice temperatures.  But rainy days make for excellent project days!  And what could be more appropriate this time of year than boot trays! Continue reading

Wood Stars

I’m so amazed by smart people.  I mean, don’t get me wrong, I like to consider myself fairy bright.  But sometimes I’m truly overwhelmed by what other people can do.  Take these stars, for instance.  It would have taken me somewhere in the ballpark of 3 months to figure out the math and the angles to make these stars “work.”  Not to mention countless piles of wasted wood as I muddled through one failed attempt after another.  Luckily, as I was saying, there are really smart people in the world.  And I wasn’t the first person who saw these wood stars at Pottery Barn and thought, “Wow!  Those are hot!”  (…and then leaned in to look at the price tag and had a mini heart attack).

Pottery Barn Milled-Log-Stars

So, huge shout-out and thanks to Rogue Engineer for the cut angles!  This is an amazingly fun project (and gave me an excuse to finally buy a brad nailer).  🙂

If you’d like to try this yourself, check out the angles and dimensions here.  A few things I learned during this project that might help you…

  1. If you make all your cuts, and attempt to assemble your star but find that it’s just not quite lining up properly… don’t panic!  The brad nailer does amazing things.  A few of the stars I made, I swore they weren’t going to come out correctly because they weren’t lining up perfectly.  But, since I spent so much time making the cuts, I decided to nail them together anyway.  And, each and every time, the nail gun pulled them together perfectly and I had great-looking stars!
  2. Depending on the type of miter saw you have, you might not need a jig for the 54 degree angle cuts.  I have a 12″ Dewalt compound miter saw, and I’m able to set the angle at 54 degrees to make the cuts.  I suppose smaller miter saws don’t have angles this large, and you’ll have to make the jig.
  3. I used both 1×2’s & 1×3’s for my stars, and they both came out great!  The 1×2’s are better for hanging on the wall, and the 1×3’s are better as sit-abouts (IMHO).
  4. Lastly, don’t spend a lot of time filling gaps with wood putty and sanding everything perfectly.  Some of my favorite stars are the ones I “rushed” through because they turn out looking more distressed and “real” looking.

Dresser Rehab with Hidden Compartment

Our very good friends Chris & Shara are expecting a baby in November.  When they mentioned that they were paying someone to redo a dresser for them, we said, “Excuse me?? Why would you pay a stranger to do that when we would LOVE to do the project for you!”  They did decide to entrust us with the dresser, and here’s the result!

BEFORE

BEFORE

AFTER

AFTER (see the missing handle??  LOL, counting is hard)

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